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Bowsette Making – A quick guide to making the new Princess of the Internet

The latest fad to hit the internet was one that took many people by surprise and was quick to grab the attention cosplayers. A female Bowser with hints of Peach mixed in? Sign the internet up!

I have been asked for assistance on a basic guide on creating Bowsette, so this blog is going to breakdown the basics to create this cosplay. External links and promoted items will be marked as such.

Super Crown

There is no Bowsette without the Super Crown. Plain and simple.

Several creators have already posted videos on how to make your own Super Crown (External link) and even Lion and I have collaborated to make a 3D printed Super Crown (Promo link) you can order as well. So the creation or purchase of this item should be easier now.

Wig and Styling

Since this character is fan made, there isn’t a set style for the hair. As such, I’ll be touching base on good base wigs to use for common styles and tutorials for the styling.

Bowsette

Source (External Link)

This form of Bowsette has a high pony tail design. Amazon (external link) and Wig-supplier (external link) carries a good base wig for this design. Although Arda (external link) and Epic Cosplay (external link) carry decent starters, you’d need to spend time cutting the ponytails to a better length for Bowsette.

For this design, a basic understanding of spiking bangs is all that’s needed for styling. There are a few tutorials on Youtube such as this one. (external link)

Horns:

Along with tutorials about to create horns with EVA foam, (external link) there are 3D printed designs available for the horns as well. Conveniently, we have the horns in our shop (Promo link) as well.

Shell:

The shell can be made with EVA foam, purchase (external link) a foam base and color, or you can purchase a backpack (external link) that has the look you’re after.

Dress:

Funny enough, Simplicity has a Peach pattern (external link) already that you can follow. The top is different, so it may be easier to use a base top like a bunny suit (external link) or corset and attach the skirt from the peach pattern or any long length skirt (external link).

Note: The bunny suit is also good for other designs of Bowsette that are floating about.

 

This is obviously not an end all, be all for creating a Bowsette cosplay, but the hope is that this gives you a good enough start for you to be able to create your very own Super Crowned character.

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Dying Wigs with Ink

I’ve been dying wigs for about 3 years now and I’ve finally took the time to write down my general information on how to make a good dye. This technique also works great for dying synthetic furs as well.

Ingredients:

70% Isopropyl Alcohol (found in any health wellness section of anystore)

Acrylic Ink (Personal fan of Dr PH Martin’s Bombay Inda Ink. http://www.dickblick.com/products/dr-ph-martins-bombay-india-inks/ Found in Hobby Lobby {After a good hunt around, the current confirmed Hobby Lobby that carries it all the time is located at 80th and Wadsworth} or Amazon)

Recipe:

Roughly 8 droppers of ink for every 1 cup of alcohol

Variations/Lessons learned:

Want a lighter color? Less ink

Darker/richer color? Add more ink

Red and blue easily overtake other colors. (IE: after a pale green? 6 droppers of yellow, 1/2 a dropper of blue (maybe even less), slowly add more blue if needed.)

There is no such thing as black ink. It’s normally a dark green/red/purple. If you’re after black, you’re going to have to get Katie Bair’s wig dye (even then, I’ve never tested the black, so I don’t know if this is true)

Application types (GLOVES!! DON’T FORGET GLOVES!!):

Soak – Basic and easy. Fill a sink/bowl with the color (Note: Plastics WILL get dyed. Stick to metal or be willing to sacrafice a container), add wig or fur to the container. Swish around, pull out, let set somewhere to dry .

Spray – Fill a spray bottle with the dye (note: that bottle is now stuck for that color {or close variations} for the rest of its life. If you’re going to do this, go to Sally’s and get a cheap bottle from there) and spray wig/fur with the dye. (Note: This one can end up with spotty affects if it’s not saturated enough). For a wig, comb through. For fur, rub through. Let dry.

Paintbrush – With any brush (personal fan of foam brushes), apply the dye, section at a time (good for streaks, layers, blending, etc etc). Comb through material, let dry.

Drying information:

THE LONGER YOU LET THE DYE DRY, THE BETTER IT’LL STICK TO THE MATERIAL. I cannot stress this enough. If you add the dye, then rinse it off, it won’t have time to stick. It’s good for insanely pale colors, but if you want the color you see (or close to), let the material dry COMPLETELY.

Rinsing information:

Stick the fur/wig in running water until the water runs clear under. I prefer cold water since it doesn’t affect the material (hot water can alter a wig if it’s too hot, etc etc) but do what you like.

Personal step: Use shampoo and conditioner on the material. The shampoo pulls the last of the dye out and the conditioner seems to help reduce the damage the alcohol does to the material. Also gets rid of the alcohol smell.

Again, let try completely. Use/style as preferred.

Some Completed Wigs:

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Dying Wigs with Sharpies – A Test

Arda Wigs has been doing an Iron Wig Competition that I have been avidly watching. Mostly because I enjoy styling wigs and love to see what other people do.

In round 2, the theme was dying the wig. One of the competitors took some in progress shots showing them use straight up sharpies to color their wig. This surprised me, and confused me for one very important reason:

Tutorial after tutorial after tutorial states that you need a carrier for the dye. Normally isopropyl alcohol is used after breaking the sharpie and using the ink casing for the color. Not once have I been told I can use to just the sharpie alone to dye a wig.

Which, got me very curious. Lucky me, I had a defective wig (Read: Wig I screwed up on and therefore planned to trash anyway) that I could test this on.

Insert me, asking my husband to color the bangs of a wig for me with sharpies. I want to test a variety of colors out and see what happens with them. So, off he went, coloring sections of the wig.

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(Rather fun looking, eh?)

After letting it dry, I asked him to wash the wig with regular shampoo until the water ran clear. Then shake out the loose water and see how the colors looked.

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Surprisingly enough, the colors still looked vibrant, so I tested the wig out with a piece of a paper towel. I lightly blotted the colors and checked what I got:

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Yep, some of the colors still bled through. Even after a washing and shampoo run. So, even if the colors look great, a small amount of sweat could leave your skin/costume colored a bit. Not really a good thing when it comes to costumes.

The wig after drying:

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It lost some of the color but wasn’t staining my hands while it was dry. However, I wasn’t done with this test. There was still one more thing I wanted to check on. After letting the wig dry completely, I did the “ultimate test.”

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Hairspray! Just a light mist across the fibers followed by a gentle pat from a paper towel.

The results:

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More dye was lost from using hairspray than after a wash! Something that isn’t too good if you’re interested in styling a colored wig after. So dying with just sharpies alone is a huge “No” in my books. Hopefully people can learn from this and not damage a wig in the process of testing something themselves.

More fun pictures:

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I ran my fingers across the still wet hairsprayed fibers and ended up with colored tipped fingers. Imagine if that was your face or a costume that this happened to!